Monday, September 1, 2014

The Late August Harvest

Happy Labor Day!  Boy, is it humid today.  In fact, temperatures are expected to be in the 80's all week long.  I spent some time this morning working in the garden, but then quickly realized that the effort was not worth the sweaty discomfort.  I guess mother nature is trying to tell us that on this holiday, it's better to sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labor.

This past week, I harvested all of the delicata squash.  Our vines succumbed early to bacterial wilt, and as a result, didn't produce very well.  While the cucumber beetles weren't too terrible this year, I guess some squash plants are more susceptible to infection than others. 

 Our summer harvest is starting to wind down a bit.  Our tomato plants, zucchini and cucumbers are still trickling in, but not to the extent of earlier this month.  I was a bit late to start my fall plantings so I have a feeling we'll be experiencing a slight hungry gap this upcoming month.  Luckily, we have quite a lot of veggies stored away.

 Last weekend, we also picked the last of the peaches.  Soon I'll do some summer pruning and then hope for another great harvest next year. 

 We've been picking quite a few peppers lately.  We generally roast our poblanos to use in a delicious Roasted Corn and Poblano Soup.  And I've been using Hungarian Wax peppers in my homemade tomato sauce.  They are also excellent for making fresh hot pickled peppers.

 Earlier this summer, I bought a columnar apple tree from Home Deport because it was 50% off.  I got one apple from the tree this year.  As expected, the taste wasn't all too great.  (It tasted just like a Granny Smith.) However, it's definitely an interesting looking tree.

 It took all summer but we're finally getting decent sized carrots from our spring sowing.  The kids have been picking and snacking on them as they go about their business.

 I can't claim credit for this harvest, but my neighbor gave us some outstanding looking pears from her young tree.  Neighborhood fruit trees are the best!  We shared some of our peaches earlier this month and received some of these beautiful pears in return.  If only more of our daily transactions can happen this way.

 I also have to mention that these pears are huge!  I placed them all in a paper bag to ripen up.

 This is my meager melon harvest this summer and I only have myself to blame.  I planted the vines too close together and neglected them all summer.  The variety is 'Collective Farm Woman'.  It's a small honeydew type melon.  I'll have to try harder next year.

Lastly, I took down one of my runner bean teepees and collected quite a few fresh beans.  I think I read somewhere that the beans were also edible.  Now I just need to figure out what to do with them.

15 comments:

  1. If anyone were in any doubt about the joys of home-grown veg, your pictures (especially the second one, with all those tomatoes) would certainly convince them! I'm happy to have found your blog. Thanks for commenting on mine too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You may have had to pull them early, but the squash look delicious. I'm always afraid to grow anything but C. moschata now. The borers always take my plants down when I don't.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What a colourful harvest - a feast for the eye as well as the tastebuds

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow, that's a colorful, varied harvest. Nice variety and color in the tomatoes. I used my poblanos in chiles rellenos but I will have to try the soup while I can still get fresh corn.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Those runner beans are gorgeous. I haven't cooked with the classic scarlet runners, but other runner beans I've tried are great in soups or salads, they have a creamy texture that I adore and they don't fall apart. Do let us know how you prepare them. It sounds like you need to do a little experimenting with grafting on that apple tree...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great looking harvest! Those are interesting looking melons. I keep thinking I need to branch out a little but I love watermelon and cantaloupe so much that I just can't give up the space. Your tomatoes look great!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Your harvests are beautiful, as usual. That roasted corn & poblano soup sounds amazing. Now I just have to grow some Poblanos. And I think you are so lucky to have a tree with Granny Smith type apples. They are actually one of my favourites - love their firm texture & tartness - but we can't grow them here because of their long growing season. Do you happen to know what variety yours is?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Margaret, here's a link to the tree variety!

    http://www.thetreefarm.com/apple-tangy-green-columnar

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great harvest and beautiful pictures as always, I'm still waiting on my melons to ripen, I lost my winter squash and cucumber to squash bugs, but the new cucumber plants are starting to bloom and setting fruits, keeping an eye on them, our weather is cooling down with shorter and shorter daylight, wonder the cukes would make it through for at least a harvest or two.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Lovely photos of the goodies, Thomas! I lost one of my delicata plants this year to bacterial wilt, so maybe they are susceptible. It is good you still got some though.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What amazing boxes of produce! To answer your question, I don't harvest runner beans fresh. I let them dry completely (or almost) on the vine and shell them. If they aren't quite dry, I let them dry naturally inside. I save out maybe 50 beans to plant next year, and the rest get eaten like you would eat any dry bean--soups, casseroles etc. Give 'em a try!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Maybe I'll try that and see what happens.

      Delete
    2. Eight Gate Farm makes a great comment. We find, the runner beans provide a good meaty texture to a stew and go particularly well with tomatoes, onion, kale and sage. But, I prefer them fresh, frenched and boiled for two minutes, with an asian style dressing (blogged about that). Hope that helps Thomas. Did you know there is a variety with golden leaves?

      Delete
  12. Wow! Great variety of tomatoes. This is the best time of the year to be in the garden. It's always exciting to see what crops decide to do well.

    ReplyDelete